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Worm farming is not new, it has been around for quite some time. There are numerous benefits to be derived from a worm farm.

Worms may be sold to fisherman or people who want to compost. Specific breeds of worms are carefully bred and are normally kept in breed specific quarters. Many of the worms that are raised in worm farms are used in composting.

Landfills and garbage dumps utilize worms which were raised by worm farmers.

Certain worms may also be used to fertilize the soil. As worms dig through the ground, they aerate and stir up the soil carrying water along. The “worm poop” that is created is high in nutrients and fertilizes the soil. A wholesome soil is then produced for better growing plants, vegetables and crops.

In recent years, the supply of worm farming equipment and accessories makes it simpler for individuals to make a hobby of this technique. Household sized bins are on the market in a variety of shapes and sizes. Home owners and apartment dwellers are given the chance to raise their own worms for waste compost and soil fertilization.

A Red Wiggler Worm

All that you will need to feed the worms in your worm farms are the fruit and vegetable scraps you would ordinarily throw into the garbage. You can also feed the worms newspaper, egg shells and hair. The waste product that the worms leave behind is called worm compost or vermicast.

Worms are also farmed for bait. Worm farmers supply many bait and tackle shops with all the worms that fisherman can use as bait.

Make sure you choose the species of worm that is best suited for the job. Some worms crawl close to the surface, others dig down into the soil. Red wiggler worms are generally used for composting while the Belgian worms are great for both composting and bait. Home owners looking for worms to keep in lawns and flower beds may find success with Night Crawlers and Wigglers.

Worm farming can certainly be an excellent educational tool. Because a worm bin doesn’t take up much space a small worm bin could easily fit in a classroom. A worm farm provides a practical experience for the kids to learn about composting. Using natural methods for composting and reducing waste in landfills is easily demonstrated by classroom worm farms.

Worms can be farmed practically anywhere. With the various systems available on the market today, home owners can raise their own supply of worms outdoors or in an apartment. The variables that must be controlled in a worm farm are the temperature, moisture, light, bedding and the type and quantity of food. In return, the reward will be a natural way of composting without filling up local landfills.

Worm Factory 360

Click to get more information about the Worm Factory 360

Red Wiggler Composting Worms

Go to Red Wiggler Composting Worms to find out more.

Are you looking for something to do that is a little unusual? If you are looking for an activity that is good for the environment and has business potential-worm farming may be for you.

Were you aware that an earthworm can lay nearly 900 eggs each year? That’s a lot of eggs! Their gastrointestinal tract helps neutralize acidic soil or soil with a high alkaline level. Gardener’s really like the soil that worms produce. Other animals eat worms-nice diet huh? A natural food that is safe and healthy. So, how could you go wrong with a good worm farm?

An interesting and strange thing to know about worm farming is that long ago Cleopatra declared earthworms to be sacred, gods of fertility. A little old earthworm was protected and cherished, death to the person who caused harm to the earthworm. Of course in the United States today the earthworm doesn’t get that form of respect. Most of the time the worm is used as bait, thought to be “icky” or simply forgotten about. Some other cultures use it for food, which could be considered sacred to a starving person!

Red Wigglers


Worms are good to eat if you are trying to lower your cholesterol level. Seriously, earthworms can reduce your cholesterol level because they contain Omega 3 oil. You may be saying that you’d rather have a high cholesterol level. Consider some of the other things that you eat. To a vegetarian, meat eaters are the sick people. Someone that eats meat might not understand how someone can live by eating only vegetables. Perhaps eating worms isn’t so crazy after all! Worms do contain protein, are very lean, and are inexpensive to farm. If you prefer a sophisticated term for this oddity, its scientific term is entomophagy.

In the United States worm farming isn’t done to produce human food, however they are raised for other reasons. Those worms in the bait shop or in the pet store need to come from somewhere. Now you know where they came from. All businesses have risks associated with them, worm farming is no exception. There is some work involved in building a productive worm farm.

Feeding your worms doesn’t cost much for a small worm farm. Worms will eat fruits and vegetables, newspapers, grass clippings and leaves. Just make sure that anything you feed them has no residues of any sort of poisons.

The easiest worm farm is a container with some dirt, air holes, newspaper bedding and some food scraps. A larger worm farm needs a method to separate the worms from the castings after the worms have done their thing. The liquid that is produced can be diluted and used to water your plants. Try starting a small worm farm to see if it is something that is of interest to you before you try to become a mega worm farmer.

Worm farming is becoming more and more popular all over the United States, this article will give you some ideas to help you start your own worm farm.

Worm farms on a large scale exist as follows: Arizona, Connecticut, New York, Oregon, South Carolina, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico-1 each. Florida, Massachusetts, Missouri, and the United Kingdom-2 each. Pennsylvania, Texas-3 each. Canada and Washington-4 each. California-15. There are many more smaller worm farms that are not listed in the major directories. All over the world there are people with small worm farms in their yard.

Any business, including worm farming, will take from 3 to 5 years to break-even after their initial investment and maintenance costs. Proper planning is the key to starting a worm farming business. Careful consideration means a better chance of netting profits sooner.

What do you know about breed stock? You can find good breed stock in a city gardener’s basement supply just as well as you can from any established breeder with the same type of worm. It isn’t unusual for someone to try to sell breed stock at an inflated price in any animal business. The population can take as long as 90 days to double no matter where you buy your breed stock.

How many worms you should start with depends on several things. What is your budget? Will you have a large or small worm farm? Do you have enough space or will you need to expand? Will this be your primary souce of income or just a side business? Do you live in an area with seasonal temperature changes and will you be able to keep the worm farm at a fairly consistent temperature? Are you going to ship worms all over the country or are you just going to sell locally?

Other useful ideas:

1. Weather changes will affect the worms. Finding them in the lid of your worm bin before it rains is no reason to panic.

2. Ants will be more likely to enter your worm bins if the bedding is dry or highly acidic. Raise the moisture content or keep the legs of your stand in a container of water. You could try applying petroleum jelly around the legs or adding some garden lime near the ant gathering spot.

3. Cover your fresh worm food with the soil in the bed or place a layer of wet newspaper over it to get rid of vinegar flies. Don’t overfeed the worms because that can attract flies and other insects if there is extra food for them.

4. If the worm bin smells you are either feeding them too much or you are feeding them food which is rotting before they can eat it. Stir the waste lightly to allow air flow and space for the worms to travel more easily and feed less. Over time you will get an idea of the amount of food the worms can digest. The amount will change as the worms multiply.

Knowing this information should help you to become an excellent worm farmer!

Some people ask, “Why in the world would I want to have a worm farm? There are plenty of other useful farms that sell vegetables, fruits, animals, and eggs. What good is a worm farm?” Well, it’s an understandable reaction. After all, it’s usually the quiet people in society that go unnoticed; so why shouldn’t there be quiet creatures that go unnoticed? People underestimate the value of the worm.

It’s true that there are worms that do damage to crops, animals, and people. Worms in your intestinal system are best flushed out. That’s why dogs and cats, even horses and cows receive worm treatments. These worms are taking away nutritional values the animals need to survive.

Worms

What about the good worms? The first reaction to a worm is, “Ewww, gross.” Well, understanding anything is the key to appreciating it more. The good worms are not poisonous and have positive benefits that are not readily seen. They’re hard-working little creatures and deserve our respect.

So, what are good worms? Earthworms, compost worms (red wigglers, blue worms), and fishing worms (night crawlers) are good worms. Earthworms are found in rich soil. If your plants are healthy and growing, chances are there are earthworms down there toiling away to help make this happen. Those die-hard fishermen can tell you about the benefits of a good, fat fishing worm! Catfish and bream are two of the types of fish that enjoy worms.

Worms are important for composting. They break down the material and produce a rich compost called vermicast or vermicompost. This compost is an excellent fertilizer. It retains moisture, encourages root growth and is high in the minerals that help plants grow.

Here’s one way you can help an earthworm (I know you want to)-the next time it rains and you see a worm on the street or sidewalk, gently move it to a grassy area so that it can burrow back into the ground. You can then congratulate yourself on being a lifesaver!

So now you know why you should create a worm farm. Worms are a vital part of our ecosystem and they do deserve our appreciation and respect.

Worm farming is an excellent way to naturally compost waste without adding to landfills. Vermicompost is produced as a result, providing a nutrient rich substance that greatly benefits gardens, crops and house plants. The worms (red wigglers) kept in worm farms demand little to remain healthy, voracious eaters. Understanding the anatomy of these worms proves useful in understanding their needs.

A worm’s body is made up of 70-95 percent water. Worms therefore require a very moist environment that should be mimicked in the worm farm. When worms die, they often shrivel up and go unnoticed as the water content is lost at this point.

Worms are cold blooded animals. Temperatures between 50-80 degrees are required to maintain the worm farm. The optimum temperature would be between 72 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit to assist the regulation of their body temperatures. Worm farms should be placed in a location that allows for this constant temperature, or bins that are insulated should be purchased.

One focus of worm farming is to have worms that will reproduce easily. Worms are hermaphrodites, meaning they possess both male and female sex organs. Worm farmers must realize that although they are hermaphrodites, they cannot self-fertilize. A single worm cannot reproduce alone. A colony of many worms will result in larger numbers being produced.

Red Wiggler

Worms used in worm farms are covered in a slimy mucus coating. This coating serves many purposes. The mucus helps the worms retain water. Since their bodies are made up of a high percentage of water, an important step when worm farming is to be sure to provide adequate moisture levels in the bin. The worm is able to hold in the required moisture level because of this mucus coating.

The worm’s mucus coating is also a protector. As the worm burrows into soil and bedding, the mucus provides a slick coat protecting it from harmful substances that may reside there.

The anatomy of the mouth of the worm is regarded as unique. In the worm, the mouth is called the Peristonium. Worms do not have teeth. Instead they have this mouth organ that is used for prying. Worm farmers should be aware that worms will be able to better compost food items that have been cut into smaller pieces. Soaked paper and cardboard products will be more easily pried apart than hard, non-soaked pieces.

Established worm farmers and those new to the hobby are often surprised to learn the life span of the worms that are commonly used in worm farming. The common lifespan of these worms is typically between 4 and 8 years. It has been reported that some worms have been known to live over 15 years.

These are long lived creatures whose lives are most often cut short by accidents. The myth that worms can be cut in half and therefore produce two worms is false. If a worm is cut behind its vital organs it will grow a new tail, but the back part will not survive. Worm farmers should always be careful when searching for worms, replacing bedding or removing vermicompost. Sharp or hard tools are likely to injure a worm or even cause death.

If provided a good diet, proper living conditions and a safe environment, worms can live long healthy lives. Healthy worms produce healthy compost that can be put to good use. Understanding the basics of the anatomy of these worms will aid in the understanding of how unique they are and how to address their needs.