Skip to content

Archive

Tag: red wiggler worms

There are 3 important factors to consider when setting up your worm farm. To begin you will want a bin that will safely hold all the worms. Next, proper bedding or compost, for the worms to live in and feed upon. Finally, the essential part of a worm farm is the worms themselves. This information will provide the guidelines you need to find the worms for your worm farm.

Do not dig worms from your yard and put them in your worm bin-these are not the correct worms to use. There are several kinds of worms that you can buy which are ideal for worm farming. There are worms that can be used as bait and also worms for composting.

The size of the worm farm that you will need is determined by how much you will be composting. One pound of worms usually will contain about 1000 worms which is the right number for a small worm farm.

You can try looking for worms in bait and tackle shops. Make sure that you select a worm that can be used as live bait and also for composting. For composting the very best worm is the Red Wiggler Worm.

51ikPSI2sCL. SL160  Where To Find Worms For Worm Farming Worm Farming ---- The Fun and Easy Way to Turn your Waste into Amazing Fertilizer!

You’re about to discover the fun and easy way to start your own worm farm. Did you know that you can turn your everyday kitchen waste into nutrient rich fertilizer for your garden, and plants? Worm farming is a great way to be playing a crucial role in our environment. You’ll find how worm composting really works, and the best methods to do it. You can make worm composting fun and easy to do!...
51ZsD63p7lL. SL160  Where To Find Worms For Worm Farming Worm Farming: Everything You Need to Know To Setting up a Successful Worm Farm
$6.92

Curious in what worm farming is? What it takes to get started? How you can make it Fun and Profitable? This is just a few of the questions that are answered within "Worm Farming: Everything You Need to Know To Setting up a Successful Worm Farm"! The ULTIMATE guide to worm farming... Discover the many benefits of what is also known as, vermicomposting. You can get free fishing bait, use as source o...
51j7gPfASxL. SL160  Where To Find Worms For Worm Farming A Beginners Guide to Organic Vegetable Gardening: Introduction to Composting, Worm Farming, No Dig Raised & Wicking Gardens Plus More... (Simple Living)

**Amazon No 1 Best Seller**Everything to get you started in your organic vegetable garden! A Beginners Guide to Organic Vegetable Gardening is full of information for the vegetable gardener starting out.  Step by step instructions and full of beautiful photographs, tables, plans and graphics.You will find information on:Planning your garden Tools that you may need or find helpf...

Go online to find dealers who specialize in worms for worm farming. You will find places to buy worms such as Red Wigglers, Florida Wigglers, Night Crawler, other exotic worms and also egg capsules. There really are many options online.

These online companies have packaging that allow the worms to be shipped safely. Care has to be taken when collecting and packaging the specimens. There really shouldn’t be any difficulties with shipping the worms, but be sure you shop around and check out the shipping options. Ask what delivery methods are available and the rate of success for the worm survival is.

You may be able to find other items for worm farming in these stores, too. Many centers have employees who can help to answer your worm farming questions. Some centers will allow you to place an order for worms they don’t normally carry in stock.

Be sure to check with other local worm farmers. They may have excess worms and would be willing to sell them to you.

Check the phone book for a listing under “worm” or “worm farms”. Most worm farmers are happy to share tips and ideas with you.

It is interesting to have a worm farm. Choosing the correct worms is the key to having a successful worm farm. Over time you will become the expert about worm farming and will be able to share your knowledge with other people.

Many schools are teaching their students about worm composting and worm farming.  Kids are encouraging their parents to set-up worm farms at home.  This recycling project is a great one that parents and children can do together.  Worm farming is simple to start, easy to maintain and it can be a very gratifying project for all.

Worm farming, unlike outdoor composting, does not require much space or work.  The worm bin can easily be kept in a garage, basement or kitchen.  The worm bin needs to be stored in a dark place that is between 50°-80°F,  and  ideally, 72°-75°F.

Worm Farm Composting Bin 150x150 Kids Encourage Parents To Set Up A Worm Farm

Worm Farm Composting Bin

To start a worn farm use a large plastic bin with a lid.  Drill ¼” holes in the bottom and top of the bin.  Worms like it dark, so make sure to use a nontransparent container. There are also commercial worm bins available for sale that are all ready to use.

The next step is to shred newspaper (black and white print only) and fill the worm bin about half way.  Dampen the paper and squeeze out any excess water.  Add a handful of dirt, a few kitchen scraps, the red wiggler worms (start with a ½ to 1 pound of red wigglers) and cover with another layer of moist shredded newspaper.  Don’t use earthworms!  The red wigglers are your best worms for composting household scraps.  You have just completed your worm farm.

To maintain your worm farm feed the worms every few days.  Foods that are not the worms’ favorites and should not be given to them are:  citrus, spicy foods, meats and dairy products. By eliminating these foods the worms will be content and will not try to escape the bin.  The worm bin should have an earthy smell to it.  If there are bad odors emanating from the worm composting bin you may be overfeeding the red wigglers or feeding them unsuitable foods, like meat and dairy which will rot in the bin.

It’s time now to sit back and let the worms do the work.  The worm castings will be available in a few months to be used for your plants, gardens and lawns. Then start the whole process over again.  Worm farming is not only an interesting project, it is a fun project that the whole family can enjoy.

Everyone has that one “hard-to-buy-for” person on their Christmas List. Still struggling with what to get that person? Have you ever thought about a worm farm factory and a pound of red wigglers? What? I bet this is something that person doesn’t have and doesn’t expect to get for Christmas. Give a gift to that special person that will keep on giving for years to come. What a great idea!

Worm Factory 360 A Gift Idea For The “Hard To Buy For” Person On Your Christmas List How About A Worm Farm?

Worm Factory 360

One of the best worm bins is The Worm Factory 360. This worm bin is a 4-tray style and is expandable. It comes in green or black and can be used anywhere. It can be kept in the kitchen, basement or any other place that is convenient to recycle household waste. The worm farm can also be kept outside because it is weatherproof. The Worm Factory 360 comes with a DVD instructional guide and an accessory kit with the basic tools needed to take care of the worm farm.

Red Wiggler Composting Worms A Gift Idea For The “Hard To Buy For” Person On Your Christmas List How About A Worm Farm?

Red Wiggler Composting Worms

Include a pack of Red Wiggler Composting Worms in your gift. Red wigglers are the worms that are best suited to recycle waste in the worm bins. The worms can be purchased in 1, 2 and 5 pound packs. A one lb. pack would be sufficient to get started with worm composting.

Worms Eat My Garbage 150x150 A Gift Idea For The “Hard To Buy For” Person On Your Christmas List How About A Worm Farm?

Worms Eat My Garbage

Enclose a copy of the book “Worms Eat My Garbage: How to Set Up and Maintain a Worm Composting System” in your Christmas gift. This guide tells you exactly how to recycle your food waste and turn it into a nutrient-rich food for your plants and garden. The book has everything in it that you need to know about worm farm composting.

The Worm Factory 360 and a pound of Red Wiggler Composting Worms will be the perfect vermicomposting gift for that “hard-to-buy-for” person this Christmas. This unique present will no doubt be talked about for many Christmases to come.

Worm farming is not new, it has been around for quite some time. There are numerous benefits to be derived from a worm farm.

Worms may be sold to fisherman or people who want to compost. Specific breeds of worms are carefully bred and are normally kept in breed specific quarters. Many of the worms that are raised in worm farms are used in composting.

Landfills and garbage dumps utilize worms which were raised by worm farmers.

Certain worms may also be used to fertilize the soil. As worms dig through the ground, they aerate and stir up the soil carrying water along. The “worm poop” that is created is high in nutrients and fertilizes the soil. A wholesome soil is then produced for better growing plants, vegetables and crops.

In recent years, the supply of worm farming equipment and accessories makes it simpler for individuals to make a hobby of this technique. Household sized bins are on the market in a variety of shapes and sizes. Home owners and apartment dwellers are given the chance to raise their own worms for waste compost and soil fertilization.

OneRedWigglerWorm 150x150 Get The Details On Worm Farming

A Red Wiggler Worm

All that you will need to feed the worms in your worm farms are the fruit and vegetable scraps you would ordinarily throw into the garbage. You can also feed the worms newspaper, egg shells and hair. The waste product that the worms leave behind is called worm compost or vermicast.

Worms are also farmed for bait. Worm farmers supply many bait and tackle shops with all the worms that fisherman can use as bait.

Make sure you choose the species of worm that is best suited for the job. Some worms crawl close to the surface, others dig down into the soil. Red wiggler worms are generally used for composting while the Belgian worms are great for both composting and bait. Home owners looking for worms to keep in lawns and flower beds may find success with Night Crawlers and Wigglers.

Worm farming can certainly be an excellent educational tool. Because a worm bin doesn’t take up much space a small worm bin could easily fit in a classroom. A worm farm provides a practical experience for the kids to learn about composting. Using natural methods for composting and reducing waste in landfills is easily demonstrated by classroom worm farms.

Worms can be farmed practically anywhere. With the various systems available on the market today, home owners can raise their own supply of worms outdoors or in an apartment. The variables that must be controlled in a worm farm are the temperature, moisture, light, bedding and the type and quantity of food. In return, the reward will be a natural way of composting without filling up local landfills.

Worm Factory 360 Get The Details On Worm Farming

Worm Factory 360

Click to get more information about the Worm Factory 360

Red Wiggler Composting Worms Get The Details On Worm Farming

Red Wiggler Composting Worms

Go to Red Wiggler Composting Worms to find out more.

Worm farming is a fun and simple activity. Even if you haven’t been brave enough to hold a worm before, don’t let that stop you from making a whole farm of them! This article will explore some interesting and crazy facts about worms and worm farming.

Worms 150x150 Worms And Worm Farming Odd & Interesting Facts

Worms

Let’s start by discussing the various types of “worms”. Earthworms loosen the soil by digging through it. Compost worms eat the mulch layer of soil. Many “worms” are actually the larva of beetles or moths. Grub worms are the larvae of a variety of beetles, including Japanese beetles, June bugs, European chafer, and Oriental beetle. Catalpa worms are not really worms either. They’re caterpillars from a moth species that are known to infest the Catalpa tree. The catalpa worm is an excellent fishing bait . Tomato hornworms are the larva of sphinx (hummingbird or hawk) moth.

Grub Worm 150x150 Worms And Worm Farming Odd & Interesting Facts

Grub Worm

Vermicomposting is using worms to compost. Worms are great little workers that will turn your household waste into a rich soil. The vermicompost they produce can be used on your plants and flowers and will really make a difference in the plant growth.

You can build a worm bin out of wood, plastic, concrete, an old bucket, or an old bathtub. Make sure that you have a drain in your bin. You can’t let your worm dirt get too soggy. They rise to the top of the ground after a rain for a reason, you know.

The liquid drainage is another benefit of your worm farm-it can be used to create a worm tea. No, you don’t drink it!  Dilute this and some of the vermicompost with water and this makes an excellent, all-natural fertilizer for your plants and flowers.

So to get started you need a worm bin, the worms (red wigglers work the best) and whatever you are going to recycle. Worm farming can be an inexpensive way for you to recycle household waste, create fertilizer and produce a rich soil.